Tips for Applying for a Hipp Grant

Read and follow the guidelines. Many applications cannot be considered for funding because they do not comply with the guidelines. Common problems include:

  • The application is not typed.
  • The timeline indicates that expenditures would precede receipt of the grant (that is, the grant would be spent before it is awarded).
  • The application is missing the signatures of the coordinator, local president, and/or school superintendent.

The project summary or body of the grant proposal identifies the school district, town, county, or local association. (Since grants are judged “blindly” by a committee of NJEA members, identifying the origin of the grant would compromise the integrity of the process.)

Hints on applying for a Hipp grant

Applying for a grant from the NJEA Frederick L. Hipp Foundation is easier than ever:

  • Carefully review all the information under What every applicant needs to know, which outlines the types of grants funded and the information that should be included in each section of the application.
  • Check out the recipients of previous grants the Foundation has funded to get ideas.
  • Form your project team and plan the grant program as a team, but avoid “writing by committee.” Have the best grant writer on the team draft the application for review by the other team members.
  • Complete the application form. The PDF document can be completed electronically, saved on your computer, and then printed when done. If you prefer a Word document version, or that we mail you a hard copy, contact us at hippfoundation@njea.org
  • Be sure to follow all instructions, especially the requirement that the Project Summary and Sections A-E must be anonymous.
  • Be sure the application clearly communicates your project in a cohesive manner – that the Objectives section address the Needs Assessment, the Project Plan leads to the objectives, the Budget section directly addresses costs of the Project Plan, and the evaluation addresses how the project objectives were met.
  • Get hints on grant writing from web sites such as www.schoolgrants.org
  • Frequently Asked Questions

Have a friend or colleague who is unfamiliar with your project read the draft application. Does it make sense? Does it leave unanswered questions?